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Keron 4

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Red Label
Yellow Label
  • 1 person
  • The Akto is a spacious and amazingly light solo tent with true all season function.
Akto green

A note on colors: Fabric dyes have natural variations, so the actual tent color may look slightly different from what is pictured here or in our catalog.

Colors: Green, Red, or Sand Green Red sand
Akto $530

Minimum Weight
Packed Weight

Outer tent fabric

Poles (9 mm)

Pegs

1.3 kg/2 lbs 13 oz
1.7 kg/3 lbs 12 oz

Kerlon 1200

1 x 293 cm
1 x 115.4 in

10 V-Peg

"Minimum Weight" refers to the outer and inner tents and the poles only. "Packed Weight" includes all items that come with the tent.

An Akto in the Rothiemuychus forest of Scotland. An Akto next to a lake in Sweden. An Akto exposed on a field of snow in a mountain range during a ski trip. An Akto exposed next to a lone tree on a field in Jämtland, Sweden.
Akto $530

When we first introduced the Akto nearly 20 years ago, we did not know that it would become as popular as it has. Although only slightly heavier than a bivy bag, the Akto offers near-luxury, all-season shelter for the solo traveler – lodging that includes a vestibule and a packed size small enough to fit into a side pocket on many packs.

It’s an ideal choice any time you need the lightest weight, all season solo tent, and while it was not designed for extreme use, it has proven itself on extended polar expeditions, and so will stand up well to all conditions. Hikers, climbers, bicycle tourers and sea kayakers alike have embraced its lightweight roominess, and today it is being used in every clime, all over the world. Long distance backpackers especially appreciate having a sturdy, comfortable room of their own at the end of a long day on the trail. Trekkers find it excellent lightweight accommodation insurance for when traditional lodging in far flung places is overcrowded, overpriced, or unavailable. And tall users find it one of the few solo tents available that has enough room.

“Akto” means “alone” in Sami, the language of the people indigenous to northern Scandinavia.

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All product features and measurement values, including tent weight and pole length, may vary somewhat from what is shown in our catalog, other printed items and on our website. Such differences can occur because of alterations in the design and production process and/or natural variations in the materials.

When we first introduced the Akto nearly 20 years ago, we did not know that it would become as popular as it has. Although only slightly heavier than a bivy bag, the Akto offers near-luxury, all-season shelter for the solo traveler – lodging that includes a vestibule and a packed size small enough to fit into a side pocket on many packs.

It’s an ideal choice any time you need the lightest weight, all season solo tent, and while it was not designed for extreme use, it has proven itself on extended polar expeditions, and so will stand up well to all conditions. Hikers, climbers, bicycle tourers and sea kayakers alike have embraced its lightweight roominess, and today it is being used in every clime, all over the world. Long distance backpackers especially appreciate having a sturdy, comfortable room of their own at the end of a long day on the trail. Trekkers find it excellent lightweight accommodation insurance for when traditional lodging in far flung places is overcrowded, overpriced, or unavailable. And tall users find it one of the few solo tents available that has enough room.

“Akto” means “alone” in Sami, the language of the people indigenous to northern Scandinavia.

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When we introduced the Akto in 1995, one person tents were relatively rare. There were, of course, bivy bags, but our goal was to build a better solution. We wanted a full-featured tent – with classic Hilleberg double wall construction and commensurate quality – built for one person. We wanted it to be roomy enough for that one person to move around inside it, all season strong, with a vestibule – and still very light. “I had a feeling there was a demand for such a tent,” recalls Bo Hilleberg. “And I personally wanted one!”

But others were more dubious: at that time, especially in Sweden, hiking was a very social activity, where one went out and communed with both nature and one’s friends. “I felt different,” says Bo. “I didn’t always want to sleep with someone else. Why not have your own tent? If you were to get a hotel room, you paid extra for single occupancy!”

Bo began developing what would become the Akto in 1993. The tent needed to be strong enough to work well in all seasons, yet light and packable enough to compete with bivy bags. He settled on a single pole design: “With two poles,” he says, “it would have been about the same weight as the Nallo.” Creating the ideal single pole construction, however, was no small feat. Over the course of 17 different prototypes, Bo – and his wife Renate, who was doing all the sewing on the prototypes – tried innumerable combinations. They started with just the hooped center pole, but quickly discovered that such a design did not offer enough stability. In addition, the outer tent ended up laying directly on the inner tent, defeating the function of the double wall construction. In one version, they “squared off” the design by adding two lightweight rods into each end. “The two rods kept the form of the tent much better than the hoop alone, but it was a lot of work getting it right,” recalls Bo. Thus was born the iconic shape – and function – that was revolutionary in 1995.

We now know that many adventurers want a room of their own in the backcountry, but in 1995 retailers were wary, as there were very few solo tents on the market. But despite retailer skepticism, consumers immediately took to the Akto, and it sold well from the beginning. Certainly hikers of all kinds embraced its simple, lightweight strength, but so too did climbers, hunters and cyclists. And while we assuredly don’t recommend such usage, the Akto has proved itself on both North and South Pole expeditions.

After 20 years, the Akto is still as innovatively functional today as it was in 1995. Indeed, we have changed the Akto very little since then, seeing no reason to fix what is not broken. It continues to garner accolades from users and outdoor magazines, and even from design groups. Such longevity of performance made it an easy choice for us to look to the Akto as the foundation for our new Yellow Label, one-person tent, the Enan, which continues the legacy of light, yet strong, single-pole solo tents in the Hilleberg line.

When we introduced the Akto in 1995, one person tents were relatively rare. There were, of course, bivy bags, but our goal was to build a better solution. We wanted a full-featured tent – with classic Hilleberg double wall construction and commensurate quality – built for one person. We wanted it to be roomy enough for that one person to move around inside it, all season strong, with a vestibule – and still very light. “I had a feeling there was a demand for such a tent,” recalls Bo Hilleberg. “And I personally wanted one!”

But others were more dubious: at that time, especially in Sweden, hiking was a very social activity, where one went out and communed with both nature and one’s friends. “I felt different,” says Bo. “I didn’t always want to sleep with someone else. Why not have your own tent? If you were to get a hotel room, you paid extra for single occupancy!”

Bo began developing what would become the Akto in 1993. The tent needed to be strong enough to work well in all seasons, yet light and packable enough to compete with bivy bags. He settled on a single pole design: “With two poles,” he says, “it would have been about the same weight as the Nallo.” Creating the ideal single pole construction, however, was no small feat. Over the course of 17 different prototypes, Bo – and his wife Renate, who was doing all the sewing on the prototypes – tried innumerable combinations. They started with just the hooped center pole, but quickly discovered that such a design did not offer enough stability. In addition, the outer tent ended up laying directly on the inner tent, defeating the function of the double wall construction. In one version, they “squared off” the design by adding two lightweight rods into each end. “The two rods kept the form of the tent much better than the hoop alone, but it was a lot of work getting it right,” recalls Bo. Thus was born the iconic shape – and function – that was revolutionary in 1995.

We now know that many adventurers want a room of their own in the backcountry, but in 1995 retailers were wary, as there were very few solo tents on the market. But despite retailer skepticism, consumers immediately took to the Akto, and it sold well from the beginning. Certainly hikers of all kinds embraced its simple, lightweight strength, but so too did climbers, hunters and cyclists. And while we assuredly don’t recommend such usage, the Akto has proved itself on both North and South Pole expeditions.

After 20 years, the Akto is still as innovatively functional today as it was in 1995. Indeed, we have changed the Akto very little since then, seeing no reason to fix what is not broken. It continues to garner accolades from users and outdoor magazines, and even from design groups. Such longevity of performance made it an easy choice for us to look to the Akto as the foundation for our new Yellow Label, one-person tent, the Enan, which continues the legacy of light, yet strong, single-pole solo tents in the Hilleberg line.

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Our Red Label models are true all-season tents, yet are still easily light enough for any backpacking trip. They are well-suited for nearly all users, and, unsurprisingly, they have become our most popular tents.

Before we organized our tents into the Label system – introduced in 2012 to make it easier for people to choose the right Hilleberg tent – our now-named “Red Label” models were simply called “Kerlon 1200 tents.” According to Bo Hilleberg, “The Kerlon 1200 tents were made at first for experienced backpackers who were out year ’round.” These tents were distinguished then – as Red Label tents are today – by their lighter weight, Kerlon 1200 outer tent fabric and 9 mm poles, in contrast to our Black Label models, which use stronger Kerlon 1800 in their outer tents and sturdier 10 mm poles.

Quite quickly, however, we discovered that these light yet remarkably strong Red Label tents were ideal for quite a large group of users. “Those just beginning to go into the backcountry get a tent that is reliable and offers great security for bad weather in the summer,” says Bo. “Experienced users often find them a lighter option for some of their trips. And they are quite good for families who are out in more challenging conditions.”

The first “Red Label” tent was the Nallo, introduced in 1987 as a response to those who wanted a 2-person tent similar to our Black Label Nammatj, only lighter. This led us on a quest both for new designs and a new fabric that would save even more weight without compromising our rigorous strength standards. That first Nallo spawned a collection – the Nallo 2, 3, and 4 and corresponding extended vestibule GT models – which then led to the newer design we use today. All of the subsequent Red Label tents evolved from that template: lighter fabrics, 9 mm poles, one vent up high, and often using different length poles – all to save weight without compromising true all-season strength.

Since the Nammatj to Nallo concept worked so well, we did the same with Staika to Allak, and then took it one step further and created a solo version, the Soulo. The Keron collection gave rise to the Kaitum models. The Saivo and Tarra were the inspiration for the Jannu. Both Akto and Unna, however, are “native” Red Label tents in that they were designed not to be Black Label counterparts, but to be exactly what they are: outstanding solo tents for those who go out in all seasons.

We know that the smaller Red Label tents – especially the Jannu and Soulo – are tremendously strong, and that leads some very experienced people to use them, quite successfully, for things which we don’t necessarily recommend Red Label tents. Eric Larsen took an Akto on his attempt to bicycle to the South Pole. Lonnie Dupre used a Soulo in the first winter solo ascent of Denali. And Alexander Barber continues to use the Soulo and Jannu in his solo climbs of the Himalayan 8000 m peaks. We do, however, advise against using Red Label tents for those doing sustained, multi-month journeys – round-the-world bicycle, motorcycle or trekking tours, for example. For these kinds of demanding adventures, we still recommend taking a stronger, more durable Black Label tent.

Such extreme usage aside, Red Label tents are ideal for those who find themselves out in all seasons and all weather, and who want an outstanding balance of light weight, strength, and overall comfort. For more on selecting the right tent for you, please see “Choosing the right Hilleberg tent."

Our Red Label models are true all-season tents, yet are still easily light enough for any backpacking trip. They are well-suited for nearly all users, and, unsurprisingly, they have become our most popular tents.

Before we organized our tents into the Label system – introduced in 2012 to make it easier for people to choose the right Hilleberg tent – our now-named “Red Label” models were simply called “Kerlon 1200 tents.” According to Bo Hilleberg, “The Kerlon 1200 tents were made at first for experienced backpackers who were out year ’round.” These tents were distinguished then – as Red Label tents are today – by their lighter weight, Kerlon 1200 outer tent fabric and 9 mm poles, in contrast to our Black Label models, which use stronger Kerlon 1800 in their outer tents and sturdier 10 mm poles.

Quite quickly, however, we discovered that these light yet remarkably strong Red Label tents were ideal for quite a large group of users. “Those just beginning to go into the backcountry get a tent that is reliable and offers great security for bad weather in the summer,” says Bo. “Experienced users often find them a lighter option for some of their trips. And they are quite good for families who are out in more challenging conditions.”

The first “Red Label” tent was the Nallo, introduced in 1987 as a response to those who wanted a 2-person tent similar to our Black Label Nammatj, only lighter. This led us on a quest both for new designs and a new fabric that would save even more weight without compromising our rigorous strength standards. That first Nallo spawned a collection – the Nallo 2, 3, and 4 and corresponding extended vestibule GT models – which then led to the newer design we use today. All of the subsequent Red Label tents evolved from that template: lighter fabrics, 9 mm poles, one vent up high, and often using different length poles – all to save weight without compromising true all-season strength.

Since the Nammatj to Nallo concept worked so well, we did the same with Staika to Allak, and then took it one step further and created a solo version, the Soulo. The Keron collection gave rise to the Kaitum models. The Saivo and Tarra were the inspiration for the Jannu. Both Akto and Unna, however, are “native” Red Label tents in that they were designed not to be Black Label counterparts, but to be exactly what they are: outstanding solo tents for those who go out in all seasons.

We know that the smaller Red Label tents – especially the Jannu and Soulo – are tremendously strong, and that leads some very experienced people to use them, quite successfully, for things which we don’t necessarily recommend Red Label tents. Eric Larsen took an Akto on his attempt to bicycle to the South Pole. Lonnie Dupre used a Soulo in the first winter solo ascent of Denali. And Alexander Barber continues to use the Soulo and Jannu in his solo climbs of the Himalayan 8000 m peaks. We do, however, advise against using Red Label tents for those doing sustained, multi-month journeys – round-the-world bicycle, motorcycle or trekking tours, for example. For these kinds of demanding adventures, we still recommend taking a stronger, more durable Black Label tent.

Such extreme usage aside, Red Label tents are ideal for those who find themselves out in all seasons and all weather, and who want an outstanding balance of light weight, strength, and overall comfort. For more on selecting the right tent for you, please see “Choosing the right Hilleberg tent."

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  • Kerlon 1200 outer tent fabric and 9mm poles make for a very lightweight yet supremely stable tent.
  • All season construction: outer tent walls extend to the ground and mesh areas are backed with adjustable fabric panels.
  • Tunnel construction offers maximum space to weight ratio and is the ideal choice for mobile journeys.
  • Plenty of room for one occupant and his or her gear.
  • Linked but seperable inner and outer tent for simultaneous pitching.
  • Basic pitching requires only four pegs in the head and foot end guy lines, and the simple, single-opening, continuous pole sleeve and tensioner system is quick to pitch and remarkably stable. (note: pegging out the four corners provides optimal floor space, venting and overall tent function and is highly recommended.)
  • The single entrance/single vestibule configuration affords easy access as well as storage space.
  • An optional footprint covers the entire area of the outer tent, including the vestibules. It connects directly to the tent, and can be left attached during pitching.
  • The inner tent can be replaced with a Mesh Inner tent (sold separately; see accessories).
  • The outer and inner tents can be used separately. Pitching the inner tent alone requires optional pole holderes (see accessories).
Akto 3D rendering.

Vents

x

Vents

Zipper adjustable vents in head and foor ends of the outer tent provide good air flow, and are protected from rain by the angled design of the end itself.

Zipper flaps

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Zipper flaps

Large flaps protect zippers from the rain.

Bathtub floor

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Bathtub floor

High bathtub floor keeps out ground water.

Pocket

x

Pocket

Integrated stowage pocket.

Venting fabric

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Venting fabric

Venting fabric on head and foot ends keeps out snow, yet is highly breathable.

Guy lines

x

Guy lines

Looped guy lines affixed to twin attachments on each side of the pole increase stability in poor conditions.

Integrated door and vent

x

Integrated door and vent

Integrated door and vent. The top of the door also acts as the vent's adjusting mechanism.

Fabric backed mesh doors

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Fabric backed mesh doors

Partial no-see-um mesh on inner tent door is covered by an adjustable, fabric panel for all season comfort.

Fiberglass rods

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Fiberglass rods

Sturdy fiberglass rods in corners of the outer tent providde extra height and more useable space.

Click on the links above for more information about the Akto.

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Adventure Bike Rider

Adventure Bike Rider, a British Magazine dedicated to adventurous motorcycle touring, gave the Akto 9 out of 10, praising its sturdiness, roominess and ventilation. “Everything has been considered with the user in mind.”

Trek & Mountain • Best in Test

Britain’s Trek & Mountain tested lightweight tents and named the Akto Best in Test. “This tent was definitely made by people who use them!” they wrote. “A superb piece of kit all round.”

Adventure Travel • Review

British Magazine and website Adventure Travel lauded the Akto for its spacious, strong, and easy to pitch design, writing, “Hilleberg tents are a delight and testing one is a privilege,” wrote the reviewer. “…the Swedish company didn’t disapoint.”

The Great Outdoors • Best Buy

Britain’s The Great Outdoors has three times awarded the Akto Best Buy. In 2008, the reviewer wrote, “I still think the Akto is the best compromise between weight, space, stability and durability…What distinguishes the Akto is quality of materials and the details of design.”

Retki • Best in Test

Finland’s highly technical outdoor magazine Retki named the Akto best tent from a large group of solo models: “The top tent for solo use.”

Outdoor • Highest Rated

Premier German outdoor magazine Outdoor awarded only the Akto its highest score in a review of solo tents: “Low weight, great wind stability, and plenty of space make the Akto the best solo tent.”

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Hilleberg Akto - Pitching instruction

This is the official pitching instruction for Hilleberg Akto. This film is a supplement to the instruction booklet. We recommend that you both read the booklet carfully as well as practice handling the tent before your first backcountry trip. Thank you for choosing a Hilleberg tent and enjoy your next adventure! For more information about Hilleberg and our products, please visit our website at http://www.hilleberg.com

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While every Hilleberg tent comes with all the pegs, lines and poles you need, you may, from time to time, need replacements. You may also want to accessorize for more flexibility on your adventures: spare line runners, guy line, and pole holders let you customize your shelter to your needs; special circumstances may dictate special use pegs or additional poles for stability; or you may simply want different sorts of pegs. Footprints can extend the life of your tent and cut down on condensation in the vestibules, and a hank of our strong, light guy line cord is always useful.

Akto Mesh Inner Tent


Akto Mesh Inner Tent

Akto Mesh Inner Tent

$149

The mesh inner can also be used in place of the standard inner tent: simply disconnect the standard inner tent and button in the appropriate Mesh Inner Tent. Used alone, The mesh inner is a simple, highly versatile option for use in dry, warm conditions. Its full mesh walls provide not only maximum airiness and protection from flying and crawling insects, but also 360° views. When used in combination with a Tarp, the mesh inner retains all of its venting and viewing advantages while the Tarp provides protection from rain or shade from the sun.
Includes the pole holder kit to pitch the inner tent or mesh inner on its own.
Weight: 540 g/1 lb 3 oz

Akto/Enan Footprint

Akto/Enan Footprint

$58

This tough ground sheet helps to protect your tent’s floor from abrasion and to keep ground moisture from rising in the vestibule. This footprint covers the full area of the Akto outer tent. • Weight: 255 g/9 oz

Pole Holder Kit for Inner Tent

Pole holder kit for Akto and Enan

$13

Extra pole holders are needed when you want to pitch the inner tent by itself. Link these to the corners of the inner, and place the ends of the poles into them. The Akto Pole Holder Kit is needed to pitch the Akto inner tent on its own.

V-Pegs

V-Peg

V-Peg

$30

Every new tent includes enough pegs to pitch it, but a spare peg or two can save you the frustration of losing one in the middle of a long trip. Very light yet very strong, our V-Peg is made from hardened aluminum, and it has specifically engineered thick yet light spine and sides to prevent bending. Its "V" cross section provides a fine balance of penetration in hard ground and holding capability in looser soil. Anodized a highly visible gold, the V-peg also has an integrated string loop for easy removal from the ground.

• 16 cm/6.3" • 11 g/0.4 oz • Set of 10 pegs •

Snow & Sand Pegs

Snow & Sand Pegs

Snow and Sand Pegs

$75

Lightweight, tough and remarkably versatile, our Snow & Sand pegs are unique. After finding most so-called snow pegs to be too soft – they would bend in any but the fluffiest snow – we developed our own. Made from hardened aluminum, our Snow Pegs are built to withstand both very hard usage, including the inevitable contact with shovels, crampons and other winter gear, and very hard snow. At the same time, they are remarkably lightweight. The integrated line and hook gives you the flexibility either to bury the peg sideways in snow or sand, Deadman style, or to use it in a traditional, upright fashion. • 31 cm x 3 cm/12.2" x 1.2" • 50 g/1.8 oz • Set of 6 pegs and XP carrying bag •

Extra Poles

293 cm x 9 mm

$36

9 mm Pole Section

$8

Your tent comes with poles, an extra repair section and aluminum repair sleeve, but spare poles can come in handy, both for repairs and for "double poling," which gives extra strength and stability.

Tent and Accessory Bags

While our various stuff bags are sized for our poles, pegs, and, of course, our tents, they are also ideal for organizing your gear. Our peg bag is great for holding toiletries or other small essentials, and our larger bags, although sized for our tents, are ideal for your spare clothes, cooking gear, food or the like.

Peg bags are available only in black, and in our sturdiest XP fabric. Standard pole bags come in green or red, while the burlier XP pole bag is only available in black. Standard and XP tent bags in all sizes come in green, red and sand, come in five sizes, and have a round, sewn-in bottom. The XP versions have a sewn-in handle, as well.

Standard bags are included with the Akto.

Bags • Included

Pole Bag

$10

58 x 17 cm Tent Bag

$17

XP Bags

Peg Bag XP

$5

Pole Bag XP

$9

58 x 17 cm Tent Bag XP

$19

Guy Line and Line Runners

Our proprietary 2 & 3 mm red and white guy line cord is strong, light and easy to see. Its interwrap construction interweaves super strong Vectran cord longitudinally with polyester, producing a cord with no sheath to slip, near zero stretch, minimal water absorption, an easy-to-handle soft feel, high UV resistance, and a stout 60 kg (132 lb) breaking strength for the 2 mm and 80 kg (176 lb) for the 3 mm. • 2mm/3 mm x 25 m (82 ft) • 53 g (1.9 oz)/110 g (3.9 oz) •

These unique and reliable line runners come with every tent, but they can also be purchased separately. They lock securely on a range of different line dimensions and are easy to adjust, even while wearing mittens. • 2 and 3 mm sizes (fits our 2 & 3 mm guy line, respectively) • Set of 10 •

3 mm guy line and line runners come standard with all tents except for our Yellow Label tents which come with 2 mm guy line and line runners.

Guy Line

$24

Line Runners

$9

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