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Keron 4

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Tilmann Graner

Tilmann Graner has had a life-long love affair with the outdoors. A native of Germany, he grew up playing in the mountains, climbing rock and ice, skiing, and hiking. “Mountain climbing is my passion,” he says. “both classic mountaineering and ski mountaineering. And I like solitude, so I like to sleep in a tent!” Day to day, he lives in Sondershausen, Germany, and is a bassoonist for Loh-Orchester Sondershausen/Theater Nordhausen. “The orchestra is closed for 6 weeks in July and August,” he says, “so we travel then.” He and his partner of over 20 years, Susanne Jacoby (also a bassoonist), do one big vacation in the summer, and a shorter one in late winter. “And, of course, many small trips closer to home.” On their longer adventures, the two have trekked and/or climbed in Iceland, Yosemite, USA, Turkey and India, twice in Nepal, multiple times in Bolivia, Peru and Canada, and three times in Greenland. Shorter trips take them climbing and trekking in the Alps and Norway, among other places. Their most recent long trip was in Canada. “We were trying to reach Mt. Waddington,” he says. “We were out 16 days and didn’t see anyone and almost no signs of any humans, other than one cairn and part of a lost sleeping mat.” For most of their trips, they use their Allak, which he calls “the perfect trekking tent. It’s got excellent ventilation, it’s roomy, and it’s strong enough for nearly anything. On a three week trekking trip, it’s important to have a strong tent!” In addition to his work as a musician, Tilmann is also a professional photographer, specializing in portrait and commercial work, and stage photography, with an emphasis on dance productions (although many images he has taken on his trips have been in Hilleberg catalogs for over 10 years, including the cover shot in 2015). And he currently has an exhibition of his landscape work, “Out of the White – On the Beach,” in a regional gallery. “I like to create images that let people see – or have to guess – the size of the landscape,” he says. (For more information, see foto-tilmann-graner.de)