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Milosz Pierwola

Milosz Pierwola grew up believing that his passion for exploring was only a fantasy, and that his place was in the courtroom as an attorney. At 29, the reality dawned on him that working towards his goals of reaching the most remote destinations on earth could not happen if he was sitting behind a desk in a climate controlled room.
That year, in 2013, he ejected from his career and culture, and dove into exploring the world without looking back. After graduating from NOLS, Milo received his first real harsh environment experience – as well as an introduction to using Hilleberg tents – by completing Polar Expedition Training with world record holders Eric Larsen and Ryan Waters on frozen Lake Winnipeg during the polar vortex of Canadian winter in 2014.
“Hilleberg tents are used in this environment because of how devastatingly harsh it is. Dangerously low temperatures combined with gale force winds, snow, ice, and complete white-outs necessitate rugged and easy to use equipment because exposing any skin to the environment runs the risk of frost bite. Therefore, all expedition gear must be able to be operated with heavy gloves under extreme duress and withstand some of nature’s hardest. As Eric demonstrated, Hilleberg tents could be prepared in such a way that setting them up was as easy as unrolling, connecting two poles, and staking down the lines. Additional features such as vents, and a separate, hanging inner-tent locked a micro-environment inside and provided noticeable relief from frost build up generated by humidity from our bodies and breath. In addition, when the winds turned in the middle of the night and the tents poles and fabric were put to the test, not only did the materials hold up but rotating the tents to face the wind took mere minutes.”
On his own adventures, Milo uses an Akto. “The tent has proven itself time and time again in a wide variety of environments to be durable, spacious, efficient, and pleasantly attractive. My Akto still looks the same today as the day I received it, without any noticeable wear and tear, and I look forward to its accompanying me to my next destination.”
In 2015, Milo founded his project “World in 360,” based in New York. He films his expeditions and adventures using 360 degree cameras, then shares the films he produces, which are designed for Virtual Reality headsets, with otherwise housebound patients in hospitals, foster homes, inpatient care centers, and elderly facilities, thus allowing disabled people to experience authentic adventure.
Currently, he has partnered with the Himalayan Stove Project (HSP) – a humanitarian nonprofit dedicated to preserving the Himalayan environment and improving the health of the local people – to produce a 360 / VR look at the Everest region. The documentary series will allow audiences to “step inside” sacred monasteries, temples, and Nepalese homes, as well as Everest Base Camp (17,600-ft.). The goal is to provide an intimate look at climbers preparing to summit the world’s tallest mountain while at the same time highlighting the impact of the Himalayan Stove Project on the people of the Nepal.